Hello, Internet wanderers! I'm Diandra (dee-awn-druh). I'm a 25-year-old, cis, female, mostly hetero, middle class, black and white biracial college graduate from the DC area who is very passionate about social justice and music. Explore my blog and get to know me!
I also run virginiabands.tumblr.com.

3rd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from White People said what? with 110,454 notes

pardonmewhileipanic:

chocohawlic:

empty-venus:

Breaking news: White fuckboys on twitter bitching how funny it is that Beyoncé is a feminist when she and her dancers were provocative and half naked. Despite feminism being about empowerment and a woman’s right to do whatever the hell she pleases with it, they just don’t seem to be able to grasp this concept.

In other news, men still don’t know what feminism is, still bitter that they aren’t Beyoncé and still making themselves look like asses on the internet.

And now the weather.

I bet 5 minutes later they slid up in some DM’s asking for nudes

you know these assholes had NO PROBLEM with anything in her show until that word popped up

it’s not nudity they have a problem with

it’s a woman who is empowered and in control of how when and why she dresses and dances how she wants

when their precious male gaze is questioned or dismissed, suddenly she’s a terrible feminist, and they try and shame her for the very thing that was turning them on seconds before

Tagged: beyoncefeminism

Source: empty-venus

27th August 2014

Video


'This is the time for women in television'

Julianna Margulies after her Emmy win.

A great example of #AskHerMore

Tagged: ask her morejulianna marguliesEmmysemmys 2014the good wifealicia florrickwomen in televisionfeminism

26th August 2014

Quote reblogged from (✿◠‿◠)♥(◕‿◕✿) with 78,573 notes

Princeton University psychologist Susan Fiske took brain scans of heterosexual men while they looked at sexualised images of women wearing bikinis. She found that the part of their brains that became activated was pre-motor - areas that usually light up when people anticipate using tools. The men were reacting to the images as if the women were objects they were going to act on. Particularly shocking was the discovery that the participants who scored highest on tests of hostile sexism were those most likely to deactivate the part of the brain that considers other people’s intentions (the medial prefrontal cortex) while looking at the pictures. These men were responding to images of the women as if they were non-human.

The Equality Illusion (via lesilencieux)

BUT SEXISM ISN’T REAL Y’ALL WE’RE JUST MAKING IT UP. THIS ISN’T LITERAL OBJECTIFICATIONNAH. (via longdivisionnnn)

Fucking hell.

(via greenpeniwrite)

Horrified but not suprised. Not in the least.

(via beahbeah)

Confirmed. http://news.nationalgeographic.co.uk/news/2009/02/090216-bikinis-women-men-objects.html

(via tearsofrassilon)

Tagged: feminism

Source: thoughtfulcynic

25th August 2014

Photo reblogged from FYRGOC with 30,923 notes

halftheskymovement:

A feminist group based in Guangzhou, China staged an online protest against the sexual exploitation of women in the workplace, revealing a photograph with a message boldly written in red on a whiteboard behind them: “My vagina does not come free with my labor.” More words were written on the women’s thighs, reiterating: “Not freebies.” 
The campaign was in response to a recent fatal rape case involving a 20-year-old woman at a state-owned company who was asked by her boss to a dinner. She was sexually assaulted by her boss’s friend and died as a result of her injuries.“Don’t ask your staff to provide part-time escort services. Women should only be asked to provide knowledge or technical skills in the workplace, but not other things,” says Ye Haiyan, an advocate of women’s and children’s rights.
Read more via The New York Times.

halftheskymovement:

A feminist group based in Guangzhou, China staged an online protest against the sexual exploitation of women in the workplace, revealing a photograph with a message boldly written in red on a whiteboard behind them: “My vagina does not come free with my labor.” More words were written on the women’s thighs, reiterating: “Not freebies.” 

The campaign was in response to a recent fatal rape case involving a 20-year-old woman at a state-owned company who was asked by her boss to a dinner. She was sexually assaulted by her boss’s friend and died as a result of her injuries.“Don’t ask your staff to provide part-time escort services. Women should only be asked to provide knowledge or technical skills in the workplace, but not other things,” says Ye Haiyan, an advocate of women’s and children’s rights.

Read more via The New York Times.

Tagged: tw: rapetw: sexual assaultchinafeminism

Source: halftheskymovement

24th August 2014

Quote reblogged from Women of Color, in Solidarity with 78,182 notes

A racist woman is not a feminist; she doesn’t care about helping women, just the women who look like her and can buy the same things she can. A transphobic woman is not a feminist; she is overly concerned with policing the bodies and expressions of others. A woman against reproductive rights — to use bell hook’s own example, and an issue close to your heart — is not a feminist; she prioritizes her dogma or her disgust over the bodies of others. An ableist woman is not a feminist; she holds some Platonic ideal of what a physically or mentally “whole” person should be and tries to force the world to fit inside it.

Tagged: feminism

Source: redefiningbodyimage

26th June 2014

Photoset reblogged from staccato signals of constant information with 375,122 notes

Tagged: daily showjessica williamsrape culturefeminism

Source: sandandglass

7th June 2014

Photoset reblogged from staccato signals of constant information with 598 notes

Tagged: feminismtopangaboy meets world

Source: boymeetsworldsubs

16th March 2013

Post reblogged from فرح with 26 notes

farahjoon:

fulfilling all kinds of cultural stereotypes

image

This is a crappy pic but I saw your picture, Farah, and I remembered my own Halloween of being Jasmine (and my little sis was Raja- she’s always been really into animals haha). I was all about Jasmine- I think she was the first Disney princess I loved (then Ariel, then Belle, then Pocahontas). And honestly, the only two Disney princesses that came anything close to looking like me were Jasmine and Pocahontas. Stupid Disney couldn’t get their shit together (not that it was ever together) so by the time Princess Tiana came into existence, I was 20.

It’s a strange thing, growing up Disney as a girl of color. The representations that actually sorta reflect what you look like are so damn problematic and are always seen through the eyes of white men. But it’s still so necessary to have any sort of vaguely positive (i.e. not outright negative and hateful) representations of oneself in our media-saturated world.

I’ll never forget the time in my Native American studies class we had a discussion about Disney’s Pocahontas. Everybody was talking shit about the Disney movie and whatnot, and that class I actually spoke up. I outright said to a class of mostly white people that while I agree the movie is HIGHLY problematic, that growing up as a girl of color and not having many representations of myself in the media, Pocahontas meant a lot to me. I was so nerve-racked but I felt I had to say something to these folks who clearly can see themselves represented all the time. Pocahontas came out when I was 6, which is the age I started to really recognize race and that I was different from the almost all white people in my class (and at my school). I needed Pocahontas to make me not feel completely freakish and less-than. And I’m the first to admit that the movie is made up of all kinds of lies and wildly inaccurate history, but considering there was no African-American princess and girls of color were and continue to be scarce in the media, Pocahontas meant everything to me, simply by being brown and from Virginia.

All that to say that I have very complicated feelings about the Disney princesses of color- that while their portrayals are very very problematic, I suspect many young girls of color (like myself at a young age) find their own, positive meanings in these flawed representations. At the very least it’d be an interesting discussion to have with young women of color, particularly those who grew up in the 1990s Disney princess era.

Tagged: farahjoondisney princessesWOCmediafeminismwomanismgirlhood

1st March 2013

Photo with 1 note

I’m on my #bellhooks shit. #feminism #womanism

I’m on my #bellhooks shit. #feminism #womanism

Tagged: womanismbellhooksfeminism

18th December 2012

Quote reblogged from فرح with 124 notes

The 1970s-80s social movement called U.S. third world feminism functioned as a central locus of possibility, an insurgent social movement that shattered the construction of any one ideology as the single most correct site where truth can be represented. Indeed, without making this kind of metamove, any ‘liberation’ or social movement eventually becomes destined to repeat the oppressive authoritarianism from which it is attempting to free itself, and become trapped inside a drive for truth that ends only in producing its own brand of dominations. What U.S. third world feminism thus demanded was a new subjectivity, a political revision that denied any one ideology as the final answer, while instead positing a tactical subjectivity with the capactiy to de- and recenter, given the forms of power to be moved. These dynamics are what were required in the shift from enacting a hegemonic oppositional theory and practice to engaging in the differential form of social movement, as performed by U.S. feminists of color during the post-World War II period of great social transformation.

Chela Sandoval, Methodology of the Oppressed (via eastafrodite)

for anyone who assumes that “third world” and “feminism” are diametrically opposed or antithetical to one another

put down your Ariel Levy and Jessica Valenti

seek out documents from the grassroots collectives of the ’70s and ’80s

shit was fucking happening at this time

people will try to tell you that the ’80s was a decade marked by a ~return~ to ~traditional~ values via Ronald the Devil

but the ’80s is so fucking important

please read and watch and learn and listen

you won’t regret it

(via farahjoon)

Tagged: Chela Sandovalimportantso fucking importantfeminismWOC

Source: maarnayeri